A Commemorative Event for the 90th Anniversary of Canada-Japan Diplomatic Relations: “Kyogen Performance”

  • 29 Nov 2019
  • 6:30 PM
  • Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre (6 Garamond Court, Toronto)

This event is organized by the Consulate-General of Japan in Toronto.

The Shigeyama Kyogen troupe bills itself as “Otofu Kyogen”, as tofu is something that can be enjoyed by everyone at any time, never gets boring and is always tasteful. They are on their way to Toronto to treat you to Japan’s traditions and laughter.

DATE AND TIME: Nov. 29, 2019; doors open at 6:30pm, performance at 7:00 pm
VENUE: Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre, 6 Garamond Court, Toronto

PROGRAM:

1. “The Snail” (“Kagyu”)
2. “The Longevity Sack” (“Enmei Bukuro”)

PERFORMERS:

SHIGEYAMA Sengoro XIV
MATSUMOTO Kaoru
IGUCHI Tatsuya
YAMASHITA Moriyuki

Admission is free but requires pre-registration. Please send the following information to event@to.mofa.go.jp.

1. Requested number of seats. (Maximum of four per registration.)

2. Name of person registering. (If you are registering for a group, please list the name of each individual in your group)

3. The best way to contact you. (If the registration is for a group, we can contract you as its representative by phone or e-mail.)

*Once you have sent us your registration, we will send you a confirmation along with instructions for attendance. It will be general seating except for a few reserved seats. Registration will be closed once the venue is deemed full.

Please also direct any questions to event@to.mofa.go.jp. We look forward to receiving your registration.

“The Snail” (“Kagyu”)
“The Longevity Sack” (“Enmei Bukuro”)
Photo: KAWANISHI Yoshiki

SYNOPSES:

“The Snail” (“Kagyu”)

Taro Kaja is told by his Master to catch a snail for the Master's grandfather, as eating snails is believed to result in longevity. The Master tells Taro Kaja that a snail has a black head, carries a shell and horns sometimes grow from its head. On his way to the bamboo thicket, Taro Kaja, having never seen a real snail before, mistakes a Yamabushi (Warrior Priest) for one.

“The Longevity Sack” (“Enmei Bukuro”)

The Master of the house, seizing his opportunity when his terrifying Wife is away visiting her family, has Taro Kaja deliver divorce papers to her. The Wife, of course, returns in a furious rage, but the Master is too proud to change his mind despite his wife’s anger. The Wife then brings a large sack to take her share of their belongings. The Master says that, if she grants him the divorce, she can take whatever she wants. The Wife is overjoyed and starts looking for things to stuff into the sack, but can you guess the last item she puts in it?

This work is a masterpiece that invites the audience to laugh at the subtleties of love between husband and wife.


© Copyright 2019 The Japan Society | All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy

157 Adelaide Street West, Suite 604, Toronto, Ontario M5H 4E7 CANADA 
Tel: 416.366.4196 | admin@japansocietycanada.com


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software